Namecoin is an experimental open-source technology which improves decentralization, security, censorship resistance, privacy, and speed of certain components of the Internet infrastructure such as DNS and identities.

(For the technically minded, Namecoin is a key/value pair registration and transfer system based on the Bitcoin technology.)

Bitcoin frees money – Namecoin frees DNS, identities, and other technologies.

What can Namecoin be used for?

  • Protect free-speech rights online by making the web more resistant to censorship.
  • Attach identity information such as GPG and OTR keys and email, Bitcoin, and Bitmessage addresses to an identity of your choice.
  • Human-meaningful Tor .onion domains.
  • Decentralized TLS (HTTPS) certificate validation, backed by blockchain consensus.
  • Access websites using the .bit top-level domain.
  • Proposed ideas such as file signatures, voting, bonds/stocks/shares, web of trust, notary services, and proof of existence. (To be implemented.)

What does Namecoin do under the hood?

  • Securely record and transfer arbitrary names (keys).
  • Attach a value (data) to the names (up to 520 bytes).
  • Transact the digital currency namecoins (NMC).
  • Like bitcoins, Namecoin names are difficult to censor or seize.
  • Lookups do not generate network traffic (improves privacy).

Namecoin was the first fork of Bitcoin and still is one of the most innovative “altcoins”. It was first to implement merged mining and a decentralized DNS. Namecoin was also the first solution to Zooko’s Triangle, the long-standing problem of producing a naming system that is simultaneously secure, decentralized, and human-meaningful.

More Information

News

2017-10-11 In Phase 2 of Namecoin TLS for Firefox, I mentioned that negative certificate verification overrides were expected to be near-identical in code structure to the positive overrides that I had implemented. However, as is par for the course, Murphy’s Law decided to rear its head (but Murphy has been defeated for now).

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2017-10-07 I recently mentioned performance issues that I observed with the Firefox TLS WebExtensions Experiment. I’m happy to report that those performance issues appear to have been a false alarm, due to 2 main reasons:

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2017-09-30 As I mentioned earlier, I’ve been hacking on a fork of Firefox that exposes an API for positive and negative certificate verification overrides. When I last posted, I had gotten this working from the C++ end (assuming that a highly hacky and unclean piece of code counts as “working”). I’ve now created a WebExtensions Experiment that exposes the positive override portion of this API to WebExtensions. (Negative overrides are likely to be basically identical in code structure, I just haven’t gotten to it yet.)

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2017-09-28 The refactorings to the raw transaction API that I mentioned earlier have been merged to Namecoin Core’s master branch. I’ve been doing some experiments with it, and I used it to successfully register a name on a regtest network with only one unlock of my wallet (which covered both the name_new and name_firstupdate operations).

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2017-09-26 We’ve released ncdns v0.0.5. List of changes:

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2017-09-24 Making TLS work for Namecoin websites in Firefox has been an interesting challenge. On the positive side, Mozilla has historically exposed a number of API’s that would be useful for this purpose, and we’ve actually produced a couple of Firefox extensions that used them: the well-known Convergence for Namecoin codebase (based on Convergence by Moxie Marlinspike and customized for Namecoin by me), and the much-lesser-known nczilla (written by Hugo Landau and me, with some code borrowed from Selenium). This was a pretty big advantage over Chromium, whose developers have consistently refused to support our use cases (which forced us to use the dehydrated certificate witchcraft). On the negative side, Mozilla has a habit of removing useful API’s approximately as fast as we notice new ones. (Convergence’s required API’s were removed by Mozilla about a year or two after we started using Convergence, and nczilla’s required API’s were removed before nczilla even had a proper release, which is why nearly no one has heard of nczilla.) On the positive side, Mozilla has expressed an apparent willingness to entertain the idea of merging officially supported API’s for our use case. So, I’ve been hacking around with a fork of Firefox, hoping to come up with something that Mozilla could merge in the future. Phase 1 of that effort is now complete.

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2017-09-13 Several improvements are desirable for how Namecoin Core creates name transactions:

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2017-09-03 The ncdns-nsis project, which provides a zero-configuration Windows installer for Namecoin domain name resolution functionality, has merged SPV support, implemented via BitcoinJ. This enables Windows machines to resolve .bit domain names without having to download the full Namecoin chain.

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2017-08-31 As was announced, I represented Namecoin at the 2017 Global Conference on Educational Robotics. Although GCER doesn’t produce official recordings of their talks, I was able to obtain an amateur recording of my talk from an audience member. I’ve also posted my slides, as well as my paper from the conference proceedings.

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2017-08-24 We’ve released ncdns v0.0.4. This release incorporates a bugfix in the madns dependency, which fixes a DNSSEC signing bug. The ncdns Windows installer in this release also updated the Dnssec-Trigger dependency.

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Earlier news

For the latest news go to the Namecoin forum or check out r/namecoin.

Official anouncements will also be made on this BitcoinTalk thread.

Help keep us strong. You can donate to the Namecoin project here.

Participate

With Namecoin you can make a difference. We need your help to free information, especially in documentation, marketing, and coding. You are welcome at the forum. There may be bounties, too.